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OBJECT OF THE MONTH


Hermína Ledererová and the Terezín Family Camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau

- 1930s
- acquired as a gift in 2011
- kept in the Archives of the Jewish Museum in Prague (part of the personal papers of Jiří Glaser)


The 8th of March 2014 marks the the 70th anniversary of what can be called the largest single murder of Czechoslovak citizens during the Second World War. Hermína Ledererová was one of the prisoners who was deported to the Terezín Family Camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau in September 1943 and sent to the gas chamber six months later.
One of six siblings, Hermína Ledererová was born in Puclice, a village in West Bohemia, on 9 October 1904. She was close to her sister Anna's son Jiří who regularly visited his favourite aunt. In 1942 she wrote letters to her brother Ota who had managed to emigrate to Ecuador with his fiancé Ester and his nephew Jiří. These letters provide a vivid account of life in the village of Puclice a few weeks before deportation to the Terezín ghetto.
Hermína Ledererová selflessly cared for her sick father who died before the deportation. She was later deported on 30 October 1942 from Klatovy to Terezín on Transport Ce and on 6 September 1943 from Terezín to Auschwitz on Transport Dl. She was sent to the gas chamber on the night of 8/9 March 1944 – along with 3,790 other Jewish men, women and children from Czechoslovakia. The remaining 6-7,000 inmates of the family camp who had been deported to Auschwitz in May were exterminated in the gas chambers in mid-July 1944.
To date, the history of the Terezín Family Camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau has not been sufficiently explored or commemorated. In cooperation with other partners, the Jewish Museum in Prague has therefore prepared a special programme [click for details] for the whole of 2014 with the aim of commemorating this tragic event from various perspectives.

Archives of the Jewish Museum in Prague, the Personal Papers of Jiří Glaser, photo 8.5x13.5 cm







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