The War in Ukraine: The Jewish Museum in Prague offers a helping hand

11. 3. 2022 Overview news


The Jewish Museum in Prague will be providing Ukrainian refugees with free access to its exhibitions, and the Jewish Community of Prague will be giving them free access to the Old-New Synagogue (Altneuschul). This reflects the museum’s decision to become involved in the care of refugees in the aftermath of the Russian invasion of Ukraine. In addition, the museum is prepared to help safeguard Ukrainian museum collections and to provide expert curatorial assistance and assistance in handling collection objects.

“As an institution, we try to provide assistance that can be combined with our regular activities. Our offer to Ukrainian museums and refugees is related to this. I trust that we will be able to make their extremely difficult situation at least a little bit easier, and that a visit to our museum will hold out the promise of a return to normal life in their homeland, free of Russian occupation,” said Leo Pavlát, director of the Jewish Museum in Prague.

HELP FOR UKRAINIAN REFUGEES

The Jewish Museum in Prague will provide Ukrainian refugees with free access to its exhibitions, and the Jewish Community of Prague will give them free access to the Old-New Synagogue (Altneuschul). Entry tickets can be picked up at the museum’s Information and Reservation Centre, Maiselova 15, Prague 1–Josefov.

Єврейський музей у Празі пропонує безкоштовний вхід у свої будівлі квитки можна отримати в: інформаційному центрі, Maiselova 15, Прага 1 – Йозефов.

EVACUATION OF COLLECTIONS FROM UKRAINE

In response to an appeal received through the Association of Museums and Galleries in the Czech Republic, the Jewish Museum in Prague has offered to provide expert curatorial assistance (especially with Judaica) and assistance in handling collection objects, should Ukrainian collections be transferred to the Czech Republic.

The Jewish Museum in Prague was founded in 1906, which makes it the third oldest Jewish museum in Europe. Since regaining its independence from the state in 1994, it has operated as an interest group of legal entities. The core of its original collection included objects from synagogues and Jewish prayer houses that had been demolished as a result of the clearance of the Prague Jewish ghetto. During the Second World War, the museum was turned into a storehouse of Nazi-confiscated Jewish ceremonial objects and books, which to this day remain a living reminder of the Shoah tragedy.

The following sites are included in the tour of the museum: Maisel Synagogue, Spanish Synagogue, Pinkas Synagogue, Klausen Synagogue, Ceremonial Hall, Robert Guttmann Gallery, and the Old Jewish Cemetery.

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